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Spring Greetings.
Charlie and I have been just feeding and admiring the birds on the homestead this past month!  He did make a short trip to his hometown a couple of weeks ago and took some nice photos I am going to share with you.. 

The spring migration has started!  Our Purple Martins are starting to come back! The Hummingbirds are on the way! We are looking forward to more outdoor activity!
Charlie chased this Yellow-Throated Warbler all over the park trying for a photo. He went back the next day to try again, but the migrant had moved on!
I love his picture of this Eastern Phoebe.  The bird seems to be posing and asking for his picture to be taken!
This Hermit Thrush also was cooperative!
This is my favorite! A pair of Tree Swallows!  It looks like it could be a piece of art!
Charlie's movements were closely watched!  You never know when he might just take a picture of YOU!
 The "Winchester" Bald Eagles are back and nesting!  They had to rebuild their nest of twigs and sticks as the other one collapsed last fall. At this time of the year, they are feeding and caring for the eaglets.  We don't know how many yet.  I have several pictures of this adult apparently "just chewing" on a small branch of a stick.  Is she bored with nothing else to do?
CORNEL LAB eNEWS: Lower 48 Has 4 Times as Many Bald Eagles as a Decade Ago 
In March, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced the latest population estimate for Bald Eagles, and the news was heartening. Some 316,000 eagles now cruise the skies in the Lower 48—more than four times the previous estimate, from 2009. See how the most accurate eagle count in history was partly powered by 180,000 eBirders plus sophisticated eBird Science models.
Dig Deeper: Explore the latest Bald Eagle distribution models, including colorful animated maps that show where eagles go throughout the year.
 
We still have a Dark-eyed Junco who hoovers at the thistle feeder just long enough to grab a seed.
I am calling this my "Spring Newsletter because it is now mid April and I do not plan to do a May issue! Happy Spring!
See you in June!  Judy
   SHENANDOAH NATURALISTS
             APRIL NEWS
 
 


 
 
 
View this email in your browser
Spring Greetings.
Charlie and I have been just feeding and admiring the birds on the homestead this past month!  He did make a short trip to his hometown a couple of weeks ago and took some nice photos I am going to share with you.. 

The spring migration has started!  Our Purple Martins are starting to come back! The Hummingbirds are on the way! We are looking forward to more outdoor activity!
Charlie chased this Yellow-Throated Warbler all over the park trying for a photo. He went back the next day to try again, but the migrant had moved on!
I love his picture of this Eastern Phoebe.  The bird seems to be posing and asking for his picture to be taken!
This Hermit Thrush also was cooperative!
This is my favorite! A pair of Tree Swallows!  It looks like it could be a piece of art!
Charlie's movements were closely watched!  You never know when he might just take a picture of YOU!
 The "Winchester" Bald Eagles are back and nesting!  They had to rebuild their nest of twigs and sticks as the other one collapsed last fall. At this time of the year, they are feeding and caring for the eaglets.  We don't know how many yet.  I have several pictures of this adult apparently "just chewing" on a small branch of a stick.  Is she bored with nothing else to do?
CORNEL LAB eNEWS: Lower 48 Has 4 Times as Many Bald Eagles as a Decade Ago 
In March, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced the latest population estimate for Bald Eagles, and the news was heartening. Some 316,000 eagles now cruise the skies in the Lower 48—more than four times the previous estimate, from 2009. See how the most accurate eagle count in history was partly powered by 180,000 eBirders plus sophisticated eBird Science models.
Dig Deeper: Explore the latest Bald Eagle distribution models, including colorful animated maps that show where eagles go throughout the year.
 
We still have a Dark-eyed Junco who hoovers at the thistle feeder just long enough to grab a seed.
I am calling this my "Spring Newsletter because it is now mid April and I do not plan to do a May issue! Happy Spring!
See you in June!  Judy
Audubon Society of Northern VA https://www.audubonva.org
Here are some excerpts from an article on the web site by Greg Butcher:

In Northern Virginia, we have a golden gem of a resource that highlights anything you might want to know about spring migration of landbirds – it’s a website called MPNature. MPNature has a limitation that you might think minimizes its usefulness – it is focused on the birds (and plants) of one of the smallest and most suburban parks in Northern Virginia – Monticello Park. 
But Monticello Park has three advantages that make it a wonderful barometer of the state of landbird migration in Northern Virginia and Washington DC: 
  1. It is an amazing magnet for birds, with 124 species.
  2. Its spring birds have been meticulously documented since 2005 by Tom Albright and a host of other birders.
  3. And, of course, it has an amazing website, beautifully and purposefully created by Bill Young, Ashley Bradford and their friends.
But I had a single goal in mind – I wanted to know THE best date for spring migration in our area, so I reduced all of Tom Albright’s species-specific information to numbers, and here’s what I found out:
  • The website’s report of expected species begins on April 1, and for the first 24 days in April, you can expect 4 common migrant species that average more than 2 individuals per day. In addition, you have the chance to see about 11 other less predictable migrants on any of those 24 days.
  • Everything starts to pick up on April 25. All of a sudden, there are 7 common migrants and 14 additional possible species.
  • The good news is that peak migration lasts for 15 days: May 1 through 15. On any one of those days, you can expect 17-21 common migrants with a possible total of 33-37 migratory species, plus up to 23 of the park’s resident species.
  • The next week – May 16-22 – isn’t too bad, with 16 common migrants expected on the 16th, dropping to 11 on the 22nd and a possible total of 26-32 migratory species each day.
  • After May 23, migration drops off sharply, with only 7 or 8 migratory species expected on May 30 or 31.
A few caveats: every day is different! The above numbers are averaged over 14 years, creating great uniformity, but migration depends on the weather. On a beautiful clear night with strong southerly wings, all the migrants might pass us by. Better conditions (for seeing a lot of migrants) are rainy nights with northerly winds that keep migrants from flying too far too fast. But the only way to find out if tomorrow is a great day to see migrants is to get outside and look for yourself.
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Join them for the April Fireside Chat when they will continue to share  photo haiku as we merge into spring. This will be their third chat exploring this art form, allowing us to have fun sharing as we start to emerge from pandemic times and embrace spring! Everyone will have a chance to share their photo haiku and the stories they tell. If you missed the earlier Fireside Chats and still wish to participate, you can review the recorded March Fireside Chat online and quickly get up to speed. When: Friday, April 30, 7:00 PM Where: VIRTUAL! Fee: FREE, but registration is required To register, click here.
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They are offering the following online programs:  https://www.audubonva.org/online-programs

1, John Magee, award winning landscape designer and host of The Native Plant Podcast.
Watch the recording of John Magee’s program here.

2. learn how birds stay warm in cold weather and extreme elevations. Dr. Sahas Barve is an avian evolutionary ecologist. Watch the recording of Dr. Barve’s program here.

3. “Climate Change and its Effect on Food for Migrating Birds” Watch the recording of Dr. Gallinat’s program here.

4. Warblers are some of the most challenging birds to identify
Class 1 - Plumage and Behavior, Part 1
Learn about the appearance of the 30+ species of warblers who visit during the spring.
Class 2 - Plumage and Behavior, Part 2
Learn about the behavior of the 30+ species of wood warblers who visit during the spring.
Class 3 - Vocalizations, Part 1 
Most warblers are heard before they are seen. Learn how to identify their vocalizations so that you will be better able to find them in the field. 
Class 4 - Vocalizations Part 2 
Most warblers are heard before they are seen. Learn how to identify their vocalizations so that you will be better able to find them in the field. 

5. Want to observe wildlife from the comfort of your home? Join NOVA Parks Roving Naturalist Matt Felperin and learn all about bird feeders! Discover how to set up a feeder, make your own, and what species of birds might visit them! Click here to watch the video.

6. How about making your property more wildlife-friendly by adding plants native to Virginia?  Find out why this is important during our webinar hosted by ASNV’s Audubon at Home program.  View the presentation here.

7. If you missed the 19 March webinar on bird-window collisions, you may watch a recording of it here.

Did you know that you can help birds by drinking coffee?  The recent announcements of the loss of 3 billion birds in North America highlight seven things you can do to help save birds, and one of them is drinking shade-grown coffee.  But not all shade-grown coffee is equally beneficial to birds.  Bird-friendly shade, which includes trees up to 110 feet tall, will provide good habitat for 243 bird species, many of which migrate to North America each spring.  The Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center certifies coffees from plantations that grow organic coffee and provide the best habitat for birds.  Look for this Bird Friendly seal when you make your next purchase of coffee and help save our birds! If you can’t find Bird Friendly coffee in your local store, you can buy it direct from the National Audubon Society at Bird Friendly Coffee. (I can order coffee for you through Thanksgiving coffee at a discount, if anyone is interested.  Charlie drinks only shade grown!)
 
Loudon Wildlife Conservancy https://loudounwildlife.org
They have several videos posted on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0NKL-whgQOMRlEyg0pRPzA
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BLACK SWAMP BIRD OBSERVATORY WORDS ON BIRDS - APRIL 2021 Birding Festival
We have been to the birding festival several times! Here is a chance to “attend” for free and without leaving home!  It is organized by Kenn and Kimberly Kaufman!
This year's virtual Biggest Week will be FREE for Black Swamp Bird Observatory (BSBO) members and just $35 for non-members. For more information or to register, If you can't come to us, we'll bring NWO Birding to YOU! Read more over at the Biggest Week website.
The website https://www.bsbo.org/     has lots of interesting blogs and other links!
 

Potomac Valley Audubon Society  https://www.potomacaudubon.org
Sit back and enjoy a video to learn about the wildflowers at PVAS preserves, created by our Land & Conservation Manager, KC, during the 2020 season.

PVAS Virtual Monthly Program: Saving Island Ecosystems from an Invasive Snake
Wednesday, April 14, 7pm - 8:30pm
PVAS welcomes Nate Hawley as he presents “Saving Island Ecosystems from an Invasive Snake” for our Virtual Monthly Program via Zoom. Enjoy a live discussion about how the Brown Tree Snake was accidentally introduced to the island of Guam, and how it began to decimate Guam's native fauna. Learn about measures the conservation community has taken to address the issue, and related reptile invasive species problems being addressed globally. Learn more here.  

Climate Watch Training Tuesday, April 20, 6pm - 8pm
You are invited to join Climate Watch - a new community science project of National Audubon Society. The project involves observing birds in your area and reporting your findings in order to generate data on how birds are responding to climate change. PVAS Land and Conservation Manager, KC, is now a regional coordinator for Climate Watch in West Virginia’s Eastern Panhandle. She will train you in on the national protocol and teach you everything you need to know to get involved with this outstanding community science effort!  The training will be held online via Zoom. Register here!
 
 PVAS’ Kathy’s Corner